Making the decision to raise chickens is an exciting process. As with any exciting process, it inspires a lot of questions! We want your experience to be fun and rewarding and we will do our best to answer all of your questions. Below, we’re compiling an ever growing list of questions that our customers have been asking. Please feel free to contact us anytime with your questions and feed back at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Our Green Roof Coop is approx. 4’ wide by 4.5’ deep by 4’ tall. The roof provides about 16 square feet of growing area. The hen house and roosting area is designed to hold four chickens comfortably.

 
Our Herb Garden Coop is approx. 3.5’ wide by 8’ long by 4’ tall. The roof provides about 28 square feet of growing area. The hen house and roosting area is designed to hold four chickens comfortably.
 

In both the Green Roof Coop and the Herb Garden Coop, the hen house holds four hens comfortably. Four hens is a good place to start because it gets you about two dozen eggs a week and four hens is a nice size flock to manage.

 

Yes, this chicken coop is easily expandable. There are many ways to use this coop to expand your flock. For example, you could add a chicken wire “run” between the two coops by leaving a side open on each coop. It would be easy to attach a permanent 2x4 frame (as long as you want it to be) to 2 of the green roof chicken coops. Another option is to place the chicken coops side by side as shown below:

 

Green Roof Chicken Coop Three Wide

 

 

The costs are completely variable based upon the lumber costs in your area, the quality of materials that you use and the supplies you already have on hand. Using the highest quality materials (as we do in our kits), the cost is approximately $500 assuming that you use kiln dried, pre-primed wood and galvanized hardware. You can absolutely save costs by using “green” wood (almost ½ the cost in many cases) but we highly recommend a lot of priming and painting for longevity purposes.

 

The costs are completely variable based upon the lumber costs in your area, the quality of materials that you use and the supplies you already have on hand. Using the highest quality materials (as we do in our kits), the cost is approximately $300 assuming that you use kiln dried wood and galvanized hardware. You can absolutely save costs by using “green” wood (almost ½ the cost in many cases) but we highly recommend a lot of priming or staining for longevity purposes.

 

This is a variable depending on your surroundings. Three Rules:

  • Safe from predators: Keep the coop in the best area to be free from snakes, dogs, coyotes, etc. The safer your chickens feel, the more they will nest.
  • Level, higher ground with good drainage: You should place the coop on level ground. We also recommend higher ground as areas that are saturated with water tend to have more bacteria which brings higher risk for disease. Water saturated areas are also not good for wood and may reduce the life of the coop. It’s a good idea to level the area and dig out a 3 inch wide rectangular trench that matches the bottom of the frame (4’x4.5’). Dig the trench 3-4 inches deep and fill it with sand on the bottom and small pebbles on top. Fill up the trench until the pebbles are slightly higher (1/2 inch higher) than the ground around it. This will assist in drainage and protect the wood.
  • Noise Considerations: Your chickens are going to make noise. Place them in an area where you can hear them as you may be able to help them if a predator is close to the coop. However, we don’t recommend putting them under your bedroom window either as you may not be as excited as they are every time they lay an egg!

 

 

The Green Roof Chicken Coop is design to shield your chickens from the weather. The Green Roof helps insulate them from the sun and acts to insulate the coop in the winter time. If you live in an area that is subject to extreme cold temperatures, it is a good idea to have a climate controlled area for your pets but your chickens will nestle up in the hen house and snuggle up on the roost every night (cold and hot weather). The close proximity in the chicken coop and the green roof will help keep them warm in the winter time.

 

Well, this could be a good thing or a bad thing. As you get to know your chickens, you will learn to tell the difference between a good cluck and a bad cluck! Chickens start making noise any time there is a predator or they feel threatened. This would be considered “bad clucking”. On the other hand, every time a chicken lays an egg, she is usually very proud of herself and wants to tell the world all about it! In many cases, this excitement is contagious. Therefore, it’s common for all of your chickens to get excited every time one of them lays an egg. These are exciting times for your hens and this would be considered good “clucking”.

 


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